Experimenting with WSPR

From the WSJT/WSPR website:

WSPR implements a protocol designed for probing potential propagation paths with low-power transmissions. Normal transmissions carry a station's callsign, Maidenhead grid locator, and transmitter power in dBm. The program can decode signals with S/N as low as -28 dB in a 2500 Hz bandwidth.

The November issue of QST went into enough detail that I was able to rekindle my interest in WSPR and set up my station to listen. I had reasonable success on 40 meters, no results on 2 meters, and surprising success on 30 meters.

My station was able to easily receive transmissions from sites in Germany and the UK broadcasting with only a few watts.

I have been submitting my spots/reports to wsprnet.org; you can view that site and see some interesting report data and maps from stations around the world.

Some interesting reception reports:

Timestamp        Call   MHz       SNR Drift Grid   Pwr Reporter RGrid  km   az
2010-10-18 08:50 N4FRE   7.040128 -27  0    EM13qd  2  KC2JCJ   FN32fp 2274  56
2010-10-18 04:16 N5PG    7.040169 -23  0    EM12pw 10  KC2JCJ   FN32fp 2293  55
2010-10-18 02:48 KD5ZTE  7.040103 -27 -1    EL29ko 20  KC2JCJ   FN32fp 2409  47
2010-10-18 02:42 W5WRE   7.040118 -18 -1    EM11lg 50  KC2JCJ   FN32fp 2429  52
2010-10-17 22:40 K5YEF  10.140228 -26  0    EM13pa  5  KC2JCJ   FN32fp 2288  55
2010-10-17 20:02 DM3FG  10.140234 -21  0    JN49mt  5  KC2JCJ   FN32fp 6075 297
2010-10-17 19:58 DF5FF  10.140282 -27  0    JO40kd  5  KC2JCJ   FN32fp 6048 296
2010-10-17 19:52 DL2GAN 10.140241 -27  1    JN59nk  5  KC2JCJ   FN32fp 6227 298
2010-10-17 19:26 M0UKD  10.140252 -21  0    JO01cm 10  KC2JCJ   FN32fp 5429 290